Category: Domestic Violence

New HUD Joint Component Option Could Help Domestic Violence Survivors

Every day vulnerable people fleeing domestic violence are denied shelter.  It’s not because they don’t need it or because they are ineligible. It is simply because there is no room. Domestic violence programs are designed to provide safe refuge and support to people escaping violence.  Some require the safety of a crisis housing program for […]

Can rapid re-housing work for domestic violence survivors?

The Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence (WSCADV) recently coordinated an exciting pilot project to test a housing first approach with domestic violence (DV) survivors. They detail how rapid re-housing can work for domestic violence survivors.

Homelessness and Domestic Violence: What’s the Connection?

In the United States, there may be as many as 10 million people who experience domestic violence every year. Unfortunately, since homelessness and domestic violence are inextricably linked, some of these households will experience homelessness.

Since October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, it’s a good time to take stock of the scope of domestic violence in America and what our shelters can do to help households fleeing abuse. This topic is important to all emergency shelters (not just domestic violence shelters), as domestic violence survivors tend to end up in a variety of shelters.

Here’s How the President’s Budget Would Reduce Homelessness

Earlier this week President Obama released his proposed budget for fiscal year (FY) 2016, which begins Oct. 1, 2015. The proposal includes strong measures to help communities re-house homeless people and prevent people who are at-risk from becoming homeless. As has become typical over the past several years, however, grave disagreement between the administration and Congress over larger budget issues means a lot of uncertainty for the future of homeless programs. The President’s budget presents a feasible best-case-scenario for progress on homelessness. (The worst-case-scenario is decidedly grimmer.) It’s based on some commonsense assumptions about homelessness.

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