Category: Families

Breaking Down FY2017: What This Could Mean for Homeless Families

The Obama Administration just released its last federal budget proposal, for fiscal year 2017 (which starts October 1, 2016). Among other things, this budget request, more than any in recent years, articulates a broad and aggressive federal response to poverty and inequality in the United States. It puts housing at the center of that response, recognizing and remedying how housing crises, especially homelessness, make it nearly impossible for people to move ahead.

Thousands of Homeless Individuals Could Face Cuts to Food Assistance

SNAP helps reduce hunger for millions of struggling Americans, including many who are homeless. This vital assistance to keep food on the table will begin to dry up for over half a million of the nation’s most vulnerable people. This year, 23 states around the country are reinstating a strict time limit on how long unemployed individuals between the ages of 18-49, who are not disabled and not caring for children, are able to receive SNAP.

The Facts Around State WIOA Planning

In a previous post, we encouraged everyone to start thinking about/take a closer look at their WIOA State Plans. But with an April 1 deadline looming, there's more you need to know.

Homelessness Declined 11 Percent Since 2010, 2 Percent Since 2014

One a single night of this year, 564,708 people were experiencing homelessness in across the country. This is according to the 2015 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress (AHAR) Part 1, which was released today by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This report provides data aggregated from community point-in-time counts conducted in January and includes longitudinal trends in overall homelessness and among specific subpopulations.

So how are we doing in our efforts to end homelessness? Overall homelessness has decreased by 11.4 percent since 2010, when the Administration set ambitious goals to end veteran and chronic homelessness in five years and family and youth homelessness in 10 years. And, we have seen substantial decreases in veteran, chronic, and family homelessness in that same time period:

PAGE: 1 2 3 4 5