Category: Housing First

Apply Now for the Transatlantic Practice Exchange

Are you a motivated, mid-level professional in the homeless assistance field? Do you want to explore best practices in the UK? If this describes you, I’ve got some exciting news: the application is now open for the Transatlantic Practice Exchange.

The Transatlantic Practice Exchange is an opportunity for five professionals from the homeless services field in the U.S., and five from the UK, to spend up to two weeks learning about a topic area of interest across the pond. During their placement, they will explore their topic with a host organization and other organizations locally. On their return, they’ll write a report on the lessons they've learned, and work to implement the lessons in their own work.

Here’s Your Chance to Learn Homelessness Best Practices in the UK

How often do homeless service professionals in the U.S. get the opportunity to travel to a foreign country to learn about best practices?

Until recently, the answer to that question was “almost never.” Now, thanks to a partnership between the Alliance, Homeless Link, and the Oak Foundation, five motivated mid-level homeless assistance professionals will get the chance to learn about a practice area in the United Kingdom.

Homelessness and Domestic Violence: What’s the Connection?

In the United States, there may be as many as 10 million people who experience domestic violence every year. Unfortunately, since homelessness and domestic violence are inextricably linked, some of these households will experience homelessness.

Since October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, it’s a good time to take stock of the scope of domestic violence in America and what our shelters can do to help households fleeing abuse. This topic is important to all emergency shelters (not just domestic violence shelters), as domestic violence survivors tend to end up in a variety of shelters.

Youth Homelessness in the FY 2015 NOFA

While the new CoC Program NOFA has lots of great parts, like its focus on encouraging programs to adopt a Housing First approach and prioritize serving unsheltered people, the most exciting part for me was all the great new homeless youth content.

Before I get into the details, it should be noted that young people ages 18 to 24 are also counted among the chronic, domestic violence, and family homelessness populations (and maybe even the veterans). So that means that all of the great NOFA insights my Alliance colleagues have been blogging and webcasting about also apply to youth.

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