Category: Youth

From Shame to Pride, Through Storytelling

America places a lot of value on a story. A good story can top the New York Times Best Seller List or rake in millions at the box office. A good story can change the world.

At the True Colors Fund, we hear a lot of stories – from young people who have experienced homelessness, from the service providers who work with them, and from supporters across the country who want to make a difference. To the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) community, an important form of storytelling is “coming out.” Living authentically in one's affirmed sexual orientation or gender identity often means sharing that story time and time again. And it isn’t always easy.

Coming out as LGBTQ shouldn’t be a shameful thing. But, to many, it is. Experiencing homelessness shouldn’t be a shameful thing. But, to many, it is.

Host Homes for Homeless Youth

This video is a recording of a webinar that originally streamed May 26, 2015, as part of our ongoing youth practice knowledge project series. In the webinar, speakers explored two host homes programs in Minnesota and Nebraska, including the challenges of host homes and their benefits, both for young people and for the communities in which the model is used.

Family Intervention for Homeless and At-Risk Youth

This video is a recording of a webinar that originally streamed April 7, 2015, on family intervention models for homeless and at-risk youth. The Alliance highlighted two effective family intervention models that we learned about as part of our youth homelessness Practice Knowledge Project. Presenters discussed the models used by Cocoon House (Everett, WA) and the Ruth Ellis Center (Detroit, MI).

Opposition Statement to the Homeless Children and Youth Act

You might have heard of the Homeless Children and Youth Act (S.256), which was introduced by Senator Dianne Feinstein to address family and youth homelessness. The Alliance opposes this bill because it will not solve the housing problems of families and youth that it aims to, and makes significant changes to the homeless assistance system that are unnecessary, burdensome, and harmful. This document explains three detrimental impacts this bill would have and suggests alternative approaches to address the problems the bill aims to address.

The State of Homelessness in America: Trends in Youth Homelessness

It is a generally acknowledged truth that kids can be difficult, particularly teenagers. Homeless kids are difficult, too—but I’m not talking about mood swings or rebellion. I’m talking about data. Counting homeless unaccompanied children (below age 18) and youth (ages 18 to 24) is one of the many challenging tasks that homeless advocates face.

Each January, communities across the country conduct Point-in-Time Counts. These counts give a national snapshot of homelessness on a single night, and are a valuable tool in monitoring trends in homelessness. Point-in-Time Counts are challenging, and they became even more so in 2013 when the federal government mandated that communities begin counting homeless unaccompanied children and youth.

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