Agenda

Agenda at a Glance

Please note that the agenda is subject to change. 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2019

  • Name Badge Pick-up and Registration • 3:00 – 6:00 p.m.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2019

  • Morning Snack with Coffee and Tea • 8:00 – 8:45 a.m.
  • Name Badge Pick-up and Registration • 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
  • Opening Plenary with Nan Roman, President and CEO, National Alliance to End Homelessness • 9:00 – 9:45 a.m.

Workshops I • 10:00 – 11:15 a.m.

  • 1.01 Understanding and Responding to Unsheltered Homelessness 
  • 1.02 Innovations in Housing: Working Outside of HUD to Create New Opportunities 
  • 1.03 Rapid Re-Housing for Individual Homeless Adults: No Need to Reinvent the Wheel 
  • 1.04 Homelessness and Workforce Systems Speed-Dating: Making the Perfect Match 
  • 1.05 Identifying and Implementing Behavioral Health Strategies with Special Attention to Race 
  • 1.06 Overcoming Legal Barriers 
  • 1.07 Coordinated Approaches to Ending Youth Homelessness 
  • 1.08 Special Considerations: Homelessness Among Undocumented Individuals
View Session Descriptions

1.01 Understanding and Responding to Unsheltered Homelessness
Nearly half of homeless individual adults are unsheltered, yet surprisingly little is known overall about this population – its characteristics, how long people are homeless, what works to end their homelessness, and where they go when they exit. To end unsheltered homelessness, we need to understand it. Learn what is known about the population and solutions, and how to use data to better understand the situation in your jurisdiction.

1.02 Innovations in Housing: Working Outside of HUD to Create New Opportunities
HUD is typically thought of as the source of funding for affordable housing development. But more recently, establishments like hospitals and insurance companies are investing in housing, and local governments are getting more involved. Learn more about these new investments, how they got started, and how CoCs can partner with these types of funding sources.

1.03 Rapid Re-Housing for Individual Homeless Adults: No Need to Reinvent the Wheel
Homeless individuals receive a disproportionately small amount of rapid re-housing, even though SSVF shows that it works extremely well for them, including those with disabilities. Learn how to tap into established knowledge about rapid re-housing practice to help homeless individuals, even those who are unsheltered, have criminal histories, lack of income, or have no employment history.

1.04 Homelessness and Workforce Systems Speed-Dating: Making the Perfect Match
Though they are natural partners in ending homelessness, CoCs and public workforce systems often lack meaningful connections. In the face of time-limited housing resources, linking individual homeless adults to living-wage jobs is critical to maintaining housing. Examine systemic responses to increase employment and income—while reducing racial disparities—through enhanced coordinated entry, innovative funding sources, and workforce partnerships.

1.05 Identifying and Implementing Behavioral Health Strategies with Special Attention to Race
Mental health and substance use disorders disproportionately affect people experiencing homelessness—racial trauma confounds these effects. Explore solutions that prioritize how to address the mental health challenges exacerbated by homelessness, and partnerships that provide integrated services for better outcomes. Also learn the scope of services needed to ensure that the trauma among homeless African-Americans is adequately addressed and that disparities in the homelessness system are avoided.

1.06 Overcoming Legal Barriers
Criminal records, outstanding bench warrants, and child support court orders are among many legal issues that can impede a person’s ability to attain employment and escape homelessness. Examine innovative ways to help homeless adults overcome legal barriers while preventing them from facing new challenges due to the criminalization of homelessness.

1.07 Coordinated Approaches to Ending Youth Homelessness
Boosted by HUD's Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program, the response to youth homelessness is becoming more systems-focused. Learn how YHDP communities are partnering with Youth Action Boards to ramp up their crisis response, implement innovative interventions, enhance coordinated entry and access, and connect to mainstream resources.

1.08 Special Considerations: Homelessness Among Undocumented Individuals 
When people who are undocumented become homeless, their level of risk – especially to trafficking – increases exponentially. Explore homelessness among individual adults who are undocumented; understand the current legal landscape and how it affects what homelessness systems and providers can do; and learn the most effective ways to find and serve undocumented individual adults, including those being trafficked.

  • Lunch Plenary • 11:30 a.m. – 1:15 p.m.
    Lunch will be served after the program. 

Workshops II • 1:45 – 3:00 p.m.

  • 2.01 Approaches to Encampment Resolution 
  • 2.02 How to Ramp Up Shelter Capacity, Quickly 
  • 2.03 Section 811 Housing Vouchers: New Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities 
  • 2.04 Coordinated Entry: Making It Work for Everyone 
  • 2.05 Longer-Term Crisis Housing Models for Individual Adults
  • 2.06 Critical Connections: Engaging Unsheltered Adults 
  • 2.07 Three Best Practices to Connect Jobseekers Experiencing Homelessness to Employment 
  • 2.08 Preventing Homelessness for Youth Exiting Foster Care
View Session Descriptions

2.01 Approaches to Encampment Resolution
Examine how different communities have tried to close encampments in ways that were positive both for their residents, and for the community. What were the goals and strategies? How did they help various sub-populations like drug users, immigrants, and people with mental illness? What were the outcomes? Learn what worked and what did not and share your own experiences.

2.02 How to Ramp Up Shelter Capacity, Quickly
Communities with large unsheltered populations are experimenting with ways to quickly ramp up shelter. Hear about the benefits and challenges of different options and considerations about design elements, cost-effectiveness, managing NIMBYism, and matching every bed with a housing strategy. The discussion will include examples such as pop-up shelters, sprung structures, tiny home villages, transitional housing conversion, and use of existing buildings.

2.03 Section 811 Housing Vouchers: New Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities
HUD’s award of new Section 811 housing vouchers for nonelderly people with disabilities has literally opened the door for more chronically homeless individuals to be housed. Hear from some of the CoCs awarded the new vouchers and explore the importance of cross-sector partnerships. Importantly, understand how the new vouchers can be used to help those in permanent supportive housing “Move-On,” creating space for more chronically homeless people to be housed. 2.04 Coordinated Entry: Making It Work for Everyone
The most effective coordinated entry system allows a community to coordinate providers and agencies to ensure that individual adults have fair access to assistance regardless of their population or race. Hear how communities are shaping coordinated entry systems that consider and address the unique needs of young adults and survivors of domestic violence. And learn how to analyze your data to ensure that the coordinated entry process is equitable for people of color and other populations.

2.05 Longer-Term Crisis Housing Models for Individual Adults 
What role do longer-term crisis housing models like bridge housing, transitional housing, and the TH-RRH joint component play in a community’s crisis response? Who are the people for whom these models might be needed? Hear how providers and systems leaders are answering those questions and using their data to use longer-term crisis housing in the most strategic ways.

2.06 Critical Connections: Engaging Unsheltered Adults
Unsheltered adults are often difficult to engage. What new models are providers testing to work with adults who have remained largely outside of the homeless service system? What are the key skills that frontline workers should possess to successfully engage and connect them to shelter and housing? How can programs ensure that engagement strategies are racially equitable? Examine the answers to these questions and explore how to improve outcomes.

2.07 Three Best Practices to Connect Jobseekers Experiencing Homelessness to Employment
Supported employment, trauma-informed care training for employers and workforce partners, and employer engagement are critical components of effective employment programs for individual adults and youth. Learn about best practices in these areas, including implementation strategies that can specifically help reduce racial disparities.

2.08 Preventing Homelessness for Youth Exiting Foster Care  
What are the most effective tools to help youth exiting foster care avoid homelessness and achieve stable housing? Which foster youth are at greatest risk of homelessness and how can more intensive case management and housing support be mobilized to support them? Learn about the promise of extended foster care, improved discharge plans, and evidence-based case management approaches to reduce homelessness for young adults exiting foster care.

Workshops III • 3:20 – 4:45 p.m. 

  • 3.01 Are Sanctioned Encampments a Good Idea? 
  • 3.02 Assessing Shelter Capacity 
  • 3.03 Tailoring RRH Responses: Taking Populations and Geographies into Account 
  • 3.04 Designing Coordinated Entry Systems and Prioritization to Better Serve Individual Adults 
  • 3.05 How Diversion Techniques are Helping Avert Homelessness and Facilitating Self-Resolution 
  • 3.06 Designing Adequate Services in PSH for Highly Vulnerable or Disabled Individuals 
  • 3.07 Building State Medicaid and Housing Agency Partnerships 
  • 3.08 Identifying and Mobilizing Community Resources to Expand Shelter Options
View Session Descriptions

3.01 Are Sanctioned Encampments a Good Idea?
Is it a good idea to sanction outdoor encampments? Discuss the legal, moral, political, and practical considerations of sanctioned encampments. If encampments are sanctioned, what is their role, what should their goals be, and how long they should be in place? Consider how providers interact with them, and learn how to evaluate outcomes and costs of sanctioned encampments versus other interventions.

3.02 Assessing Shelter Capacity
Is more shelter the answer to unsheltered homelessness? If so, how much more? How can communities increase turnover to make better use of the shelter they have? Since shelter, alone, is not the answer, how does it link directly to housing? Explore the right-sizing and proper role of shelter in ending homelessness among individual adults.

3.03 Tailoring RRH Responses: Taking Populations and Geographies into Account 
Everyone experiencing homelessness needs the core components that RRH provides: help finding housing, help paying for housing, and help staying in housing. Discover how RRH providers are tweaking the model to make it work for youth, survivors of domestic violence, and in rural areas.

3.04 Designing Coordinated Entry Systems and Prioritization to Better Serve Individual Adults
CoCs are struggling to find ways to end homelessness for individual adults, who are rarely prioritized for housing interventions. Explore a more dynamic prioritization approach, which considers the dynamic nature of a person’s vulnerability, needs and preferences as well as the complexities of housing assets in a community. Discuss the critical importance of problem-solving services, particularly to individuals who may never be matched to rapid re-housing or permanent supportive housing.

3.05 How Diversion Techniques are Helping Avert Homelessness and Facilitating Self-Resolution 
Diversion is an approach that helps people seeking shelter identify and access alternatives to shelter entry. The same techniques can also be used to facilitate self-resolution so people exit homelessness more quickly. Learn the key components of diversion and self-resolution, examine how it is being used to assist adults, and understand its impact in reducing homelessness and demand for shelter.

3.06 Designing Adequate Services in PSH for Highly Vulnerable or Disabled Individuals 
As communities prioritize their highest need people for permanent supportive housing (PSH), programs are finding that they need to have different staffing, different and more intensive services, and the involvement of outside service partners. Discuss ways to re-design services in PSH for higher-need participants; re-think how PSH units can be designed to allow for better monitoring and communal engagement for older adults and chronic substance users; and explore better service coordination and partnership across other systems.

3.07 Building State Medicaid and Housing Agency Partnerships 
Medicaid and housing agencies serve an overlapping population: people experiencing homelessness, people with substance abuse and mental health issues, people with complex needs, and so on. Learn about communities that have formed co-partnerships with state Medicaid agencies and local housing groups to align health and housing initiatives. Hear how they have worked together to identify resources to create additional opportunities for services.

3.08 Identifying and Mobilizing Community Resources to Expand Shelter Options 
Unused office space, faith facilities, backyards, and people’s empty bedrooms are among the many different community resources that are being considered to expand emergency shelter options for individual homeless adults, especially for young adults and in rural areas. Examine the effectiveness of various community-based shelter options and learn how providers and advocates build support for their use.

  • Networking by the Bay • 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.
    Conference attendees will  have an opportunity to network and enjoy a cash bar and light fare. 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2019

  • Continental Breakfast • 8:00- 9:00 a.m.
  • Name Badge Pick-up and Registration • 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Workshops IV • 9:15 – 10:30 a.m.

  • 4.01 Helping Everyone Go Home: Resolving Homelessness for People Who Aren’t Prioritized for a Housing Intervention
  • 4.02 Targeted Shelter: When to Specialize? 
  • 4.03 Partnering with Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) to End Individual Adult Homelessness
  • 4.04 Opioid Use Among Homeless Individuals 
  • 4.05 Making Housing the Primary Goal of Emergency Shelter Services 
  • 4.06 When the Closest Shelter is 100 Miles Away: Unsheltered in Rural America 
  • 4.07 Integrating and Coordinating Outreach Efforts 
  • 4.08 The Family Option
View Session Descriptions

4.01 Helping Everyone Go Home: Resolving Homelessness for People Who Aren’t Prioritized for a Housing Intervention
Homeless individuals are often the people who get the least assistance to exit homelessness, despite being the majority of a community’s homeless population. How can we ensure that people who may have lower vulnerability get access to the help they need? Discuss progressive engagement strategies, problem-solving and housing crisis resolution services for people who won’t be matched to a housing intervention such as RRH and PSH, and partnering with other systems to access other types of assistance.

4.02 Targeted Shelter: When to Specialize?
Communities with a dire shortage of emergency shelter for individual adults may find it difficult to justify operating specialized shelters serving discrete subpopulations. Discuss the merits of specialized shelter serving subgroups such as older adults, youth, women, or individuals in need of respite care. Learn how to use data to assess the need for specialized shelter and examine how to serve disparate groups across shelter programs when specialized shelter is unavailable.

4.03 Partnering with Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) to End Individual Adult Homelessness 
From providing local leadership to dedicating subsidized housing resources, PHAs can be essential partners in the fight to end individual adult homelessness. Discover how to build strong connections to a local PHA and how PHAs can prioritize their waitlists, administer CoCs, and leverage housing and services resources on behalf of people experiencing homelessness.

4.04 Opioid Use Among Homeless Individuals
Amid the homeless crisis and opioid epidemic, local agencies and service providers are challenged to balance appropriate medical care, maintain public health, and use a Housing First approach. Learn from various communities about innovative strategies to address the intersection of homelessness and Opioid Use Disorder in both rural and urban areas.

4.05 Making Housing the Primary Goal of Emergency Shelter Services
The only assistance many homeless individuals will receive is emergency shelter. That’s why it is so important for shelters to have a singular focus: helping every person get housing. This workshop will address the critical steps in making the transition to a housing-focused shelter including philosophical, operational, and practice shifts.

4.06 When the Closest Shelter is 100 Miles Away: Unsheltered in Rural America
From the frozen tundra to Appalachia, addressing rural unsheltered homelessness is often a lesson in overcoming extremes. Learn the latest research on the extent of unsheltered homelessness in rural America. Hear about innovative strategies to improve outreach across vast rural geographies and to connect people experiencing homelessness to non-traditional local shelter options.

4.07 Integrating and Coordinating Outreach Efforts
It is not uncommon for multiple providers – across multiple systems— to be engaging in outreach to people living outdoors. How can those efforts be better coordinated to increase the impact of outreach and make better use of staff? Find out the strategies localities are adopting to improve the effectiveness of outreach through improving communication and coordination of efforts across disparate systems.

4.08 The Family Option 
The home of a family member may be a viable permanent housing destination for many adults, particularly young adults and people with disabilities who may be unable to live independently. Learn how family-finding and family intervention help adults reconnect and achieve stability as secondary tenants.

  • Lunch Plenary • 11:00 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. 
    Lunch will be served after the program. 

Workshops V • 1:00 – 2:15 pm 

  • 5.01 Principles and Practice: Housing First, Harm Reduction, and Crisis Resolution
  • 5.02 Thinking Outside the One-Bedroom Apartment Box: Non-Traditional Affordable Housing Options
  • 5.03 Second Chances: Ending Homelessness for Formerly Incarcerated Individual Homeless Adults
  • 5.04 A Systemic Response to Individual Adult Homelessness in Rural Areas
  • 5.05 Win-Wins on Unsheltered Homelessness: Humane Solutions, Visible Results
  • 5.06 Experimenting with Innovative Subsidy Models
  • 5.07 Public Employees Reach Out: Partners in Ending Street Homelessness
  • 5.08 Peer Support for Individual Homeless Adults
View Session Descriptions

5.01 Principles and Practice: Housing First, Harm Reduction, and Crisis Resolution
Housing First, harm reduction, and crisis resolution are three important and inter-related strategies that communities will need to build an effective response to sheltered and unsheltered homelessness. Understand the principles behind these strategies, the skills needed to implement them, and how to use them together to improve a crisis response system.

5.02 Thinking Outside the One-Bedroom Apartment Box: Non-Traditional Affordable Housing Options
Individual adults are the largest group of people experiencing homelessness, and almost half of them are unsheltered. Few will be able to afford their own apartment, so new options must be found. Explore the possibilities of shared housing with one (or more!) roommates and re-visiting options like single-room-occupancy units, boarding houses, residential hotels, or worker “dorms.” Learn practical tips for overcoming barriers to such housing and making it happen in your community!

5.03 Second Chances: Ending Homelessness for Formerly Incarcerated Individual Homeless Adults
People returning from jail or prison disproportionately become homeless. Hear about recent research that shows the intersection between reentry and homelessness is starker and more racially disparate than previously thought. Understand how to improve housing outcomes and prevent homelessness among formerly incarcerated adults, with a special emphasis on preventing racial disparities in the process. Learn how homelessness and corrections leaders are working together to reduce both homelessness and recidivism.

5.04 A Systemic Response to Individual Adult Homelessness in Rural Areas 
Limited services and housing, overwhelming geographies, and transportation barriers can forestall a systems approach to ending homelessness in rural areas. Learn how providers and CoC leaders are building crisis response systems through coordinated entry, data tracking, and partnerships with mainstream programs. Also, hear about the strategies they use to reduce racial disparities that are more pronounced in rural America.

5.05 Win-Wins on Unsheltered Homelessness: Humane Solutions, Visible Results  
To truly end unsheltered homelessness, communities must balance the needs of people who are on the streets or in encampments with the needs and responsibilities of elected officials, housed neighbors, and business owners. Discover how this difficult balance CAN be achieved with strategies that are both effective AND show quick progress. Learn how to create partnerships with BIDS, respond to neighbor concerns, and create a suite of responses that engage community and city leaders and meet everyone’s needs.

5.06 Experimenting with Innovative Subsidy Models
The housing safety net does not currently meet the needs of people living in poverty. While rental assistance programs like Rapid Re-housing have proven effective at ensuring an exit from homelessness, people may need more help once in housing or be ineligible for longer-term support like PSH. Find out how communities are experimenting with targeting low-income households facing an immediate housing crisis with alternative subsidy programs.

5.07 Public Employees Reach Out: Partners in Ending Street Homelessness 
First responders, transit police, library and park staff may have more interaction with unsheltered people than homeless staff do. Discuss strategies to build relationships with these sometimes non-traditional partners. Learn about getting on the same page, appropriate roles, ensuring racially equitable approaches, and enhancing each other’s resources.

5.08 Peer Support for Individual Homeless Adults 
Peers can be critical in the full spectrum of work with homeless individuals. Learn from the experts how peers are being used to improve outcomes through their work on outreach teams, in permanent supportive housing, and to reduce isolation. Examine the evidence base and training necessary for successful peer interventions.

Workshops VI • 2:30 – 3:45 p.m. 

  • 6.01 Lowering Shelter Barriers for People Who Are Unsheltered
  • 6.02 How to Find, Engage, and Motivate Landlords
  • 6.03 Tailoring Outreach to Highly Vulnerable Subpopulations
  • 6.04 Data Collection on Unsheltered Homelessness for Continuous Performance Improvement
  • 6.05 Law Enforcement Partners Can Help End Individual Adult Homelessness: Here’s How!
  • 6.06 More than an Acronym Salad: The Importance of WIOA, SNAP E&T, WDBs, BIDs, and Medicaid for Jobseekers Experiencing Homelessness
  • 6.07 What Caseworkers Should Know
  • 6.08 Housing and Service Options for Older Adults
View Session Descriptions

6.01 Lowering Shelter Barriers for People Who Are Unsheltered 
Many unsheltered people report staying outside because of the high entry barriers and extensive rules and restrictions in shelters. Discover how to become a low-barrier shelter, focus on services rather than rules, maintain safety for staff and residents, and be compliant with HUD’s Equal Access Rule. Models like the Navigation Center will be examined.

6.02 How to Find, Engage, and Motivate Landlords
Individual homeless adults seeking housing confront the triple whammy of high rents, low vacancy rates, and poor tenant histories. Those of color face the additional challenge of racial discrimination. Learn the most innovative practices to build partnerships with landlords to ensure that all clients can find and stabilize in their own permanent housing. Understand the keys to landlord acceptance of Housing Choice Vouchers (Section 8).

6.03 Tailoring Outreach to Highly Vulnerable Subpopulations
While unsheltered homelessness is dangerous for all people, certain groups — women, youth, older adults, people living with a disability, and individuals who are being trafficked – may be at particularly heightened risk. Find out how localities are targeting highly vulnerable subpopulations and connecting them to safe shelter options. Reliance on peer outreach will be among the strategies explored.

6.04 Data Collection on Unsheltered Homelessness for Continuous Performance Improvement
What data should a community examine to better understand the needs and trajectories of its unsheltered population and determine which interventions are most effective at moving them out of homelessness? Discover how to use HMIS and other data to better understand the trajectory of individual adults experiencing unsheltered homelessness, the in-flow into homelessness, and to assess for potential racial disparities to inform the system’s approach to better serving this population.

6.05 Law Enforcement Partners Can Help End Individual Adult Homelessness: Here’s How!
Like people experiencing unsheltered homelessness, police are on the streets 24-7. Find out how interactions between police and homeless people on the streets can be positive rather than negative, the role that law enforcement outreach teams can play, the appropriate relationship between law enforcement and provider staff, and how to promote racially equitable law enforcement responses to homelessness.

6.06 More than an Acronym Salad: The Importance of WIOA, SNAP E&T, WDBs, BIDs, and Medicaid for Jobseekers Experiencing Homelessness
Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act programs, SNAP Employment and Training, Workforce Development Boards, Business Improvement Districts, and Medicaid provide or administer more than basic work supports, food assistance, and health care. Nationwide, these federal funding sources and local partners are supporting employment, education, and job training services for people experiencing homelessness. Explore how homelessness services and public workforce systems are relying on them to reduce homelessness among individual adults.

6.07 What Caseworkers Should Know
Harm reduction principles, trauma informed care, and cultural competence are among the core competencies expected of caseworkers and peer specialists. Explore common and emerging evidence-informed practices that are improving the effectiveness of case management and identify opportunities to promote ongoing training and skill development for frontline staff.

6.08 Housing and Service Options for Older Adults 
Older adults are one of the fastest growing groups of individuals experiencing homelessness. Yet complex health conditions, criminal justice histories, and severe racial disparities complicate the ability to connect them to housing and services. Explore the housing, service, and funding strategies employed by nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and adult protective services to end homelessness among older adults.