Category: Rapid Re-Housing

Reflections on #NAEH15: Ensuring Forward Momentum

As someone well into my second decade of NAEH conferences, I always come to the gathering with the hope and expectation of learning about new solutions to homelessness, engaging with interesting people, and honing my own skills in the field. This year, I was (once again) not disappointed.

The level of knowledge – and sophistication – that our field has achieved is impressive. We can, with increasing confidence, say that we know what it takes to make homelessness rare, brief and non-recurring, and how to apply our shared wisdom in urban, suburban and rural settings to minimize, or even prevent, the crisis of homelessness for unaccompanied youth, adults or families.

Adopting Rapid Re-Housing Statewide: The Commonwealth of Virginia

From 2010 to 2014 Virginia reduced the number of families experiencing homelessness by 25 percent. One important factor in this success was that Virginia shifted from a shelter and transitional housing-based system to one based much more on the use of a rapid re-housing approach. This paper outlines the major activities and lessons learned from this project.

Tailoring Rapid Re-Housing for Single Adults

This webinar discusses how providers are funding and tailoring rapid re-housing interventions to serve single adults. Panelists discuss what is different about serving this population as opposed to families and the impact it is having in their communities in a Q&Amp;A style format. Speakers include Kelly King Horne with Homeward in Richmond, Virginia; Jean-Michel Giraud with Friendship Place in Washington, D.C.; and Cathy Zall with New London Homeless Hospitality Center, in New London, Connecticut. The webinar was moderated by Jayme Day with the National Alliance to End Homelessness.

Putting out an RFP for a New Rapid Re-Housing Project? Here are 5 Tips for Evaluating Applicants

In this year’s NOFA Registration Notice, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is strongly encouraging Continuums of Care (CoCs) to reallocate funding to interventions that more effectively reduce homelessness.

In 2015 you can reallocate funds from existing eligible renewal projects to create new rapid re-housing projects for homeless individuals and families, including unaccompanied youth, who are coming directly from the streets, emergency shelters or who are fleeing domestic violence. If your CoC decided to reallocate funds to fund rapid re-housing through the NOFA process or if you work for a foundation or a local government that wants to fund rapid re-housing, you will probably need to write a Request for Proposals (RFP) and figure out a way to evaluate applications.

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